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25 de octubre de 2014
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Uva Relaciones Internacionales Main Page | Foreign Students Guide

Foreign Students Guide

University of Valladolid

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INDEX

  • ERASMUS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF VALLADOLID
  • THE UNIVERSITY OF VALLADOLID AND ITS SURROUNDINGS
  • UNIVERSITY OF VALLADOLID STRUCTURE
  • INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS OFFICE
  • HOW TO GET TO VALLADOLID
  • MENTOR PROGRAMME
  • ACADEMIC YEAR
  • ORIENTATION DAY
  • STUDENTS REGISTRATION AND ENROLMENT
  • SPANISH MARKS SYSTEM
  • SPANISH LANGUAGE COURSES FOR ERASMUS OR OTHER PROGRAMMES STUDENTS
  • SOCIAL SERVICES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF VALLADOLID
  • UNIVERSITY FACILITIES
  • ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE AT THE POLICE STATION
  • LIVING IN VALLADOLID
  • SOME USEFUL ADDRESSES

  • ERASMUS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF VALLADOLID

    The ERASMUS programme was established in 1987 and although it was formally adopted only shortly before the beginning of the academic year 1987/8, it was still possible for 3,244 students to participate in Erasmus in its first year.

    The ERASMUS Programme, together with a number of other independent programmes, was incorporated into the Socrates programme when that programme was established in 1995. The Socrates programme ended on 31 December 1999 and was replaced with the Socrates II programme on 24 January 2000. That, in turn, was replaced by the Lifelong Learning Programme 2007-2013 as from 1st January 2007.

    In the past twenty years, well over one-and-a-half million students - 60% of ERASMUS being female - have benefited from ERASMUS grants. There are currently more than 2300 higher education institutions participating in ERASMUS across the 31 countries involved in the new Lifelong Learning programme.

    The aim of the ERASMUS Programme is to encourage and support academic mobility of higher education students and teachers within the European Union, the European Economic Area countries of Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein as well as candidate countries (such as Turkey).

    To participate in the ERASMUS programme students must be studying for a degree or diploma at a higher education institution and must have completed their first year. They also have to be a citizen of one of the eligible countries.

    Students join the ERASMUS programme study for a period from 3 months to an academic year in another European country. The ERASMUS programme guarantees that the period spent abroad is recognised by their university when they come back as long as they abide by terms previously agreed.

    The Erasmus Programme has a number of specific objectives:
    - To improve the quality and to increase the volume of student and teaching staff mobility throughout Europe.
    - To improve the quality and increase the amount of multilateral cooperation between higher education institutions in Europe
    - To improve and increase cooperation between higher education institutions and enterprises
    - To spread innovation and new pedagogic practice and supports between universities in Europe

    The programme fosters not only learning and understanding of the host country, but also a sense of community among students from different countries. The ERASMUS experience is considered both a time for learning as well as a chance to socialize.

    Some academics have speculated that former ERASMUS students will prove to be a powerful force in creating a pan-European identity; they will be the so-called 'ERASMUS generation'.

    In 2004 the Erasmus Programme has been awarded with the “Príncipe de Asturias” Prize for International Co-operation as recognition for being one of the most important cultural exchange programmes in the whole History of the world.

    The University of Valladolid has actively taken part in the Erasmus Programme since its creation, becoming the first European university in teachers' mobility and one of the leading institutions in students' mobility.

    Furthermore, it sends and receives a great number of students in the frame of other agreements signed with European and non-European universities.

    Students from the University of Valladolid participating in the international programmes during the last ten years:

    The destinations of our students in 2011/12 were as follows:

    Likewise, our University received a similar number of foreign students:

    The origin countries of the incoming students in 2011-12 were:

    LA UNIVERSIDAD DE VALLADOLID

    General Information of the University of Valladolid is also available on Internet: www.uva.es

    HISTORY

    The University of Valladolid is one of the oldest in Spain, together with the Universities of Palencia, Salamanca and LĂ©rida. During the 13th and 14th centuries these universities formed part of a great intellectual movement which developed in Western Europe.

    The University of Valladolid was founded at the end of the 13th Century. In 1293, the first documented reference was signed by King Sancho IV of Castile. This intellectual renaissance took place at the same time as the urban expansion and material development of the great Castilian towns, of which Valladolid is a clear example.

    In the beginning, the different Faculties taught subjects such as Grammar, Arithmetic, Latin and Sacred Scripture. Later, the city obtained both the royal approval and the papal bull for this centre. In 1346, Pope Clemente VI, at the request of the king Alfonso XI, granted the title of “General Studies” to the already existing studies in Valladolid. However, it was not possible to study Theology, because it was exclusively a privilege of the University of Paris. In 1417 when the Schism ended, Pope Martin V gave Valladolid permission to build the Faculty they desired. Likewise, the kings also provided funds for the centre, thus giving it certain economic independence.

    In the 16th Century, the “Alma Mater” of Valladolid enjoyed its greatest moment of splendour, when it was declared one of the three main Universities of the kingdom, together with Salamanca and Alcalá. In 1517, the first statute appeared, written in Latin, and later in Spanish. The Faculties of Medicine and Law achieved outstanding fame, which was also the result of the existence of the neighbouring Chancery. At the end of the 15th Century, Cardinal Mendoza set up the Santa Cruz College, which from the beginning was one of the most famous Spanish University institutions.

    In 1770, under the reign of Carlos III, a general reform of the Spanish Universities took place. Although this reform was not fully consolidated at the time, during the following decades the changes were remarkable. From the beginning of the 19th Century until 1857, the old University, which had been dominated by the peculiarities and the scholastic spirit and characterised by a certain independence was transformed into a lay, liberal and centralised University. In the midst of this transformation lawyers and doctors were trained. Later on, and also during this Century, technical studies became increasingly important. The University of Valladolid, located in a medium-size city with liberal trends, has increased rapidly its number of students, and is now the largest University in the Region of Castile and Leon. In the present academic year 2011-2012 it has 25,000 students and more than 2,500 professors distributed throughout the University centres of the four provinces.